Home » Blog » Mathematics Day » Fun Mathematical Days you Need to Know About
e-Day Fun Mathematical Days you Need to Know About

Fun Mathematical Days you Need to Know About

Hello All, I came with some mathematics days which you can celebrate if you are a math lover. I already published some of the articles on this topic and you guys like it very much. So without further ado I am going to tell you the most existing way to celebrate mathematics with your friends and colleague.  

e-Day

The number e in mathematics is considered very important and that’s the reason why we celebrate e-Day. It is also known as the Euler’s number. E is the mathematical constant with the value of 2.7182818.

Euler’s Number

Leonhard Euler was a Swiss Mathematician and Euler’s Number was referred to after him which is also called the mathematical constant. He said that e is an irrational number that defines the idea that all the frequently growing systems are a go upward version of a common rate. It is mostly used in exponential growth, complex numbers, and logarithms, Euler also stated how it is an equally important number in mathematics as so are 0, 1, and Pi (π).

When is e-Day celebrated?

E-Day is celebrated on February 7 in the countries where the date is derived from the month/date format with the value of e which is 2.71 and in other countries that follow the date/month format celebrate on 27 January by taking the first three-digit of the value which is 2.71 as the date 27/1. 

How can you celebrate e-Day?

e-Day can be celebrated by learning more about the Euler’s Number and its importance, its occurrence in mathematics and science. 

You can also prepare food which starts from the letter ‘e’s like eggs, egg whites, eclairs, eggplant, even eggnog for breakfast, etc. 

e-Day is also sometimes called Napier’s Number because John Napier was the man who created logarithms so in his honor it’s called Napier’s Number as well. Let us know how you are going to celebrate the day, Happy e-Day!

Odd Day

Odd Day rules are quite simple! Be safe, be odd, and have lots of fun. Basically, an odd day is a day which singles out all those odd and wacky numbers together which we have in our calendar.

Read More : World Mathematics Day

This day doesn’t occur every year or doesn’t have a particular date; it’s celebrated when three consecutive odd numbers make up a date. Like the last time, it was an odd day on 5/7/09 (5th July 2009) and the next was on 7/9/11 (7th September 2011) this type of thing happens only twice a century. 

So, in this century you have lost the chance of celebrating an odd day if you haven’t celebrated it ever!  

Power of Ten Days

Power of Ten Days is also known as International Power of Ten Days. I’ve never heard about it until the day my classmates talked about it and I found it interesting so thought of sharing it with you all.

Read More : National Mathematics Day

When is the Power of Ten Days celebrated?

Power of Ten Days has been celebrated obviously on 10/10 every year since 2000. Four years ago, on 10/10/10 (10th October 2010) this day occurred pretty coolly, right?  

How is the Power of Ten Days celebrated?

You can celebrate by reading out about any ten facts on the power of ten days and tell about it to your friends and family. 

Read More : International Mathematics Day History

You can also watch the Power of Ten video of Jerry Becker where he shows zooming in and out on a picnic with powers of ten. 

You can also make ten dishes at home and learn more about the Power of Ten days and do fun activities at home itself.

This day was founded by Eames Demetrios and since then it is celebrated every year as the Power of Ten Days. There are also hashtags used which are #PowersOfTenDay #InternationalPowersOfTenDay. 

We also have articles on other Mathematical days like Pi Day, Pythagorean Day, World Math Day, International Day of Mathematics, National Mathematics Day, Square root day which are celebrated worldwide.

Math Storytelling Day

Math Storytelling Day is celebrated to encourage people to tell stories through math. This day is celebrated to appreciate math helping us every day in our daily lives. It can be a great day to connect students with math by making them play fun games and telling them stories about math.

When is Math Storytelling Day celebrated?

Math Storytelling Day is celebrated on 25th September every year. It was created by Maria Droujkova and Sue VanHattum in 2009. One girl asked what to do on her birthday. Maria asked her to share a math story with her friends or in your class or on a blog and that’s when she found out about this day.

How can Math Storytelling Day be celebrated?

You can start celebrating the day by sharing math stories. It can include logic, numbers, relationships, puzzles, history, character, friction, anything related to math. All are good ideas.

Read More : Pythagorean Theorem Day

You can also make up your own songs about math or even your own jokes on math and share them with your friends and family and challenge other people regarding the same as well. 

You can also watch online videos on math storytelling from educators, teachers, or students sharing their stories about math. It would be so much fun. 

You can also check out about the creators who created the day getting to know them more and how they came up with the idea. 

You can also learn about other mathematical days. Like Fibonacci Day, Sonia Kovalevsky Mathematics Day, Math 2.0 Day, and Mole Day. This is a very interesting read. You can check out those as well!

Celebration of Mind

Celebration of Mind (CoM) is a day celebrated to bring people together worldwide to share and enjoy playing puzzle games, magic tricks, and math. This day is in honor of Martin Gardner’s birthday every year on 21st October events are held all over the world to spread joy and happiness of recreational math and related subjects. 

The UNC Math Club and all the faculty held the celebration every year on or around 21st October and this evening includes everything from mathematical games, puzzles, magic tricks, and fun activities in math. 

Conclusion:

So, finally, we come to the end of the article. Wasn’t it fun to know so much about the days we wouldn’t even have heard before? Let us know how you are going to celebrate these days in the comments and I hope this article was informative to read. Thank you!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Download the Vedic Maths Syllabus